Corey Mwamba

menu

Entries for 3rd Aug 2018

Please to share that Laura Cole's solo album is out on Martin Archer's great Discus label! Not only is the music fantastic, it's a producing and mixing debut for me too. Acquire!

Discus Music | Discus Music - 71CD - Laura Cole - Enough - CD plus free download

Discus Music | Discus Music - 71CD - Laura Cole - Enough - CD plus free download

I would like to say a very warm thank you to Jason, Chris, Julie, Martin, Sarah, Ruth, Kim, Seth, Alex, Robert, Corey and Nikki for contributing their beautiful pieces for me to arrange for this album. It was an honour and an inspiration to work on them.   'Crossing...' and 'Crossing.' are improvisations based on Walt Shaw's mixed media painting, 'Crossing', which appears as the front cover artwork on this album. 'Extinguish' is for my daughter, Martha. I asked Martha to suggest a title for the composition I would write for her; and she answered immediately with the word 'extinguish'. So I wrote the piece based on this word. 'As Warm As The Sun' is for Corey Mwamba. 'Enough...' and 'Enough.' are for the sculptor, Anne Truitt, and are based on her amazing journal, 'Daybook'; reading this book was the main impetus for embarking on a residency to prepare for this album, at Lyth Arts Centre, Wick, Scotland, in September 2017. 'Garden...' and 'Garden.' are improvisations based on Walt Shaw's mixed media painting, 'Garden', which appears as the back cover artwork on this album. 'For Sam' is for Sam the Steinway at Lyth Arts Centre, whom I worked with on my residency. Sam was a lovely companion; we shared some special moments! Recorded at Steinway Recording Studios, Lincolnshire, November 19 and 20, 2017, by Spencer Cozens.   Produced, mixed and mastered by Corey Mwamba.   Follow Discus Music on Facebook   Laura Cole website

Random Coltrane thoughts, this time on language surrogacy in music (music acting as a surrogate for speech). Here's exhibit A.

Now, I don't actually agree with the programme maker's ideas on how the words and the phrases match up exactly (this is known as an abridging system).

But we do know that Coltrane based the theme on the speech. He could have done this ideographically instead (so a sound holds a concept that can be expressed linguistically). For example: "repetition of the tonic = God".

Here is exhibit B. This is the schematic for "A Love Supreme".

Towards the bottom right, it says "attempt to reach transcendent level with (orchestra)" "Horn ends on—Thank You God -" (crossed out?) "Amen These final notes by bass Say Amen—Symbolically"

#

And then centre-bottom: "Last chord to sound like final chord of Alabama"

So Coltrane was certainly using sound as metaphor here—to actually say something in the metaphorical realm.

So, what did the final chord of Alabama mean to Coltrane? What was he saying?

"Saying" will be a sticking word for some. There has been a pushback against the use of linguistic terms for describing music in certain corners of academia. But what does the researcher do when the musician actually says they want to "speak"?